Law Enforcement Leadership in the Midst of Change

CURRENT EDITION 1st
VOLUMES 1
PAGES 180
AUTHOR Jack E. Enter
ESTIMATED NEXT EDITION DATE August 31, 2023
LAST RELEASE DATE August 22, 2022
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Law Enforcement Leadership in the Midst of Change

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Law Enforcement Leadership in the Midst of Change addresses why operational personnel are effective in their jobs, but, when promoted, are rarely effective as leaders. Why is it exemplary individuals at the operational level become indecisive and detached from their responsibilities?

Law Enforcement Leadership in the Midst of Change examines why this happens, and what we can do about it personally, within our organizations, and within the law enforcement
profession.

About the Author:
Jack Enter has been associated with the field of criminal justice since 1972 when he began his
career as a law enforcement officer. Since that time, he has worked as a police officer,
detective, vice/narcotics investigator, manager, and administrator of a law enforcement agency
in the suburbs of Atlanta. He also served in law enforcement in the U.S. military.
Jack obtained his Ph.D. in 1984 and has served as a professor and administrator in the
university setting and served as one of the planners of the security component of the 1996
Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta. He has lectured throughout the United States and abroad
on Leadership as well as Profiling Interpersonal Violence and The Future of Crime and Policing.
Jack lives outside Atlanta with his wife Barbara. They have three adult children and seven
grandchildren.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL CHALLENGES


SECTION 1 WHAT MAKES PEOPLE EFFECTIVE OR INEFFECTIVE?


Chapter 1 Effectiveness is Based on Training and the Acquisition
of Skills
§ 1.1 Training One: What is Training? The Process

§ 1.2 The Focus of Training: “What Are the Most Critical
“Tools” or Skills

§ 1.2.1 Intrapersonal Skills (Attitude/Character):
“Attitude is Everything
§ 1.2.1.1 Pride (“Me”) § 1.2.1.2 Humility (“We”)

§ 1.2.1.3 Pronouns are Important

§ 1.2.2 Interpersonal Skills (Communication/Engagement Skills): the “Fruit” of the Battle Between “Me” and “We”
§ 1.2.2.1 Verbal Words
§ 1.2.2.2 Nonverbal Behavior
§ 1.2.2.3 Engagement Behavior
§ 1.2.2.4 Speaking Truth

Chapter 2 The Role of Relationships/Modeling and the Role Accountability in the Learning and Acquisition of Skills
§ 2.1 Training Two: Learning Skills is Primarily Learned Through Relationships and Modeling
§ 2.1.1 Learning/Acquiring Skills is Primarily Through People Around Us

§ 2.2 Training Three: Skills Must Be Reinforced Through Accountability

Chapter 3 The Impact of Training Upon Our Thinking
§ 3.1 Our View of Ourselves and Others—The Battle Between “Me” and “We”
§ 3.2 Reality versus Perceptions: Do We Think Based on Reality, or Are We Delusional?
§ 3.3 One’s Purpose and Meaning: The Role of Mission
§ 3.4 Who/What We Fear: The Importance of the Peer Group
Chapter 4 The “Test” of Training and Correct Thinking: “Rise to the Occasion” or “Fight and Flight?”
§ 4.1 Introduction
§ 4.2 Fight or Flight or Rising to the Occasion
§ 4.3 Identifying the Reaction

SECTION 2 APPLYING THE CONCEPTS

Chapter 5 Applying These Concepts to American Society
§ 5.1 Introduction
§ 5.2 Training One: Effectiveness is Based on Training and the Acquisition of Skills
§ 5.3 Training Two: Learning Skills is Primarily Through Relationships and Modeling
§ 5.4 Training Three: Accountability
§ 5.5 Training (or Lack of Training) Influences the Way We Think
§ 5.5.1 Our View of Ourselves and Others: The Battle Between “Me” and “We”
§ 5.5.2 Reality versus Perceptions: Are We Delusional or Grounded in Reality?
§ 5.6 One’s Purpose and Meaning: The Role of Mission
§ 5.7 Who/What We Fear: The Importance of the Peer Group
§ 5.8 The Ultimate “Test” for Training and Correct Thinking: Can We “Rise to the Occasion” or Do We Fear and Resort to Fight or Flight Behavior?
§ 5.8.1 Fight Behavior: Anger and Frustration
§ 5.8.1.1 Spontaneous Acts of Violence
§ 5.8.1.2 Accelerated Relational Violence
§ 5.8.1.3 “Payback” Violence
§ 5.8.1.4 Individual “Terrorists”

§ 5.8.2 Flight Behavior
§ 5.8.2.1 Addiction
§ 5.8.2.2 ­Mental Health and Other Problems
§ 5.9 Conclusion
Chapter 6 Applying These Concepts to The Operational Law Enforcement Culture
§ 6.1 Introduction
§ 6.2 Training One: Effectiveness is Based on Training and the Acquisition of Skills
§ 6.3 Training Two: Learning Skills is Primarily Through Relationships and Modeling
§ 6.4 Training Three: Skills Must Be Reinforced Through Accountability
§ 6.5 Training (or Lack of Training) Influences the Way We Think
§ 6.6 Our View of Ourselves and Others: The Battle Between “Me” and “We”
§ 6.7 Reality versus Perceptions: Are We Delusional or Grounded in Reality?
§ 6.8 One’s Purpose and Meaning: The Role of Mission
§ 6.9 Who/What We Fear: The Importance of the Peer Group
§ 6.10 The “Test” Results of Training and Correct Thinking: “Rise to the Occasion” or Fight and Flight?
Chapter 7 Applying These Principles to The Law Enforcement Management Culture
§ 7.1 Training One: Effectiveness is Based on Training and the Acquisition of Skills
§ 7.2 Training Two: Learning Skills is Primarily Through Relationships and Modeling
§ 7.3 Training Three: Skills Must be Reinforced Through Accountability
§ 7.4 Training (or Lack of Training) Influences the Way We Think
§ 7.5 Our View of Ourselves and Others: The Battle Between “Me” and “We”
§ 7.6 Reality versus Perception: Are We Delusional or Grounded in Reality?
§ 7.7 One’s Purpose and Meaning: The Role of Mission

§ 7.8 Who/What We Fear: The Importance of the Peer Group
§ 7.9 The “Test” of Training and Correct Thinking: Can Managers “Rise to the Occasion” or Because of Fear, Do They Fight, Flee or Freeze?
Chapter 8 The Cost of Leadership Failure upon the Law Enforcement Organization
§ 8.1 Introduction
§ 8.2 The Chart
§ 8.3 The Three Groups Defined
§ 8.3.1 The Very Good/Effective Employee
§ 8.3.2 The Very Bad/Defective Employee
§ 8.3.3 The Normal/Reflective Employee
§ 8.4 The Management Culture: The Confusing and Unpredictable Manner in Which They Respond to the Three Types of Employees
§ 8.4.1 Management Response to the Very Good Group
§ 8.4.2 Management Response to the Very Bad Group
§ 8.4.3 Management Response to the Normal/Reflective Group
§ 8.5 What Causes Stress in Law Enforcement?
Chapter 9 Solutions for Law Enforcement Management’s Failure to Lead
§ 9.1 Introduction
§ 9.2 Does Leadership Training Work?
§ 9.2.1 Problem One: Leadership Training is Not Training
§ 9.2.2 Problem Two: The Intuitive Understanding of Leadership Principles
§ 9.3 Testing These Two Observations
§ 9.3.1 The First Test: The Conversation in the Classroom
§ 9.3.2 The Second Test: “Finish the Statement”
Chapter 10 The Power of Self Deception
§ 10.1 Introduction
§ 10.2 The Problem of Pride
§ 10.3 The Failure of Others to Speak Truth to Us

§ 10.4 The “Test” of Leadership
§ 10.5 Conclusion

SECTION 3 BECOMING A LEADER

Chapter 11 The Process of Becoming a Leader: The Four Stages
of Competence/Learning
§ 11.1 Introduction
§ 11.2 Unconscious Incompetence
§ 11.3 Conscious Incompetence
§ 11.4 Conscious Competence
§ 11.5 Unconscious Competence
§ 11.6 Conclusion
Chapter 12 The Root of Leadership - Learning to Think Like a Leader in the Context of the Group
§ 12.1 Introduction
§ 12.2 Selecting the “Three or More” People
§ 12.3 Benefits of Others Helping You Become a Leader
§ 12.3.1 Benefits Inherent in This Approach to Leadership
Chapter 13 Becoming A Leader: The Role of Discipline and Follow Through
§ 13.1 Introduction
§ 13.2 The Role of Discipline in the Thinking of the Leader
§ 13.3 Becoming a Leader in Your Thinking: The Importance of Follow Through
§ 13.3.1 Writing it Down
§ 13.3.2 . . . . and Scheduling It
§ 13.4 Conclusion
Chapter 14 Becoming a Leader in Your Actions—Engaging and
Building Relationships Through Communication
§ 14.1 Introduction
§ 14.2 Pre-Communication Strategies
§ 14.3 The Initial Individual Interviews
§ 14.4 Management by Walking Around - MBWA
§ 14.4.1 Some Guidelines before You Show Up and Practice MBWA
§ 14.5 Conclusion

Chapter 15 Becoming a Leader in Your Actions: Encouragement and Mentoring
§ 15.1 Introduction
§ 15.2 Training Through Encouragement: Reinforcing Good Behavior
§ 15.3 Encouraging the Best Employees
§ 15.4 Encouraging the Middle Group/Reflective Employees
§ 15.5 Forms or “Tools” of Motivation
§ 15.6 Mentoring Others
§ 15.6.1 Overall Mentoring Guidelines
§ 15.6.2 Mentoring Operational Personnel
§ 15.6.3 Mentoring Supervisors and Managers
Chapter 16 Becoming a Leader Through Your Actions
§ 16.1 Introduction
§ 16.2 First Step: Developing a Mindset as to the Importance of Accountability through Discipline and Confrontation
§ 16.2.1 The Law Enforcement Operational Mission is Grounded in the Concept of Accountability and Speaking Truth to Others
§ 16.2.2 We Need to Be Close to Perfect in the
Manner in Which We Handle Ineffectiveness Within our Ranks
§ 16.2.3 Law Enforcement Should Intuitively
Understand and Practice the Need for Accountability
§ 16.2.4 Silence and Inaction in the Presence of Stupidity and Evil is Never a Reasonable Option
§ 16.2.5 The Level of Confrontation and Accountability Must Fit the Nature of the Offense
§ 16.2.6 Duty to Intercede is Everyone’s Responsibility
§ 16.2.7 Accountability Must be Enforced for All Levels of the Organizations to Include Managers
§ 16.3 Second Step: Training Accountability
§ 16.3.1 Training/Enforcing the Mindsets
§ 16.4 Third Step: “Problem Finding” Through Gathering and Monitoring Information
§ 16.4.1 Gathering Data - Operational Personnel
§ 16.4.2 Gathering Data on Supervisors and Managers

§ 16.5 Fourth Step: Deciding a Course of Action When Confrontation is Required
§ 16.6 Conclusion
Chapter 17 Agency Strategies to Develop a Leadership Culture
§ 17.1 Introduction
§ 17.2 Training One: Effectiveness is Based on Training and the
Acquisition of Skills
§ 17.2.1 Promotional Systems
§ 17.2.2 Post Promotional Training
§ 17.3 Training Two: Learning Skills is Primarily Through Relationships and Modeling
§ 17.4 Training Three: Skills Must Be Reinforced Through Accountability
§ 17.5 Training (or Lack of Training) Influences the Way We Think
§ 17.6 Our View of Ourselves and Others: The Battle Between “Me” and “We”
§ 17.7 Reality versus Perceptions: Are We Delusional or Grounded in Reality?
§ 17.8 One’s Purpose and Meaning: The Role of Mission
§ 17.9 Who/What We Fear: The Importance of the Peer Group
§ 17.10 Agency Strategies for Practicing Leadership—From Thinking to Actions
§ 17.10.1 Communication
§ 17.10.2 Encouragement and Mentoring
§ 17.10.3 Accountability
Chapter 18 Being a Leader at Home and in Your Personal Life
§ 18.1 Introduction
§ 18.2 Training One: Effectiveness is Based on Training and the Acquisition of Skills
§ 18.3 Training Two: Learning Skills is Primarily Through Relationships and Modeling
§ 18.4 Training Three: Skills Must Be Reinforced Through Accountability
§ 18.5 Our View of Ourselves and Others: The Battle Between “Me” and “We”

§ 18.6 Reality versus Perceptions: Are We Delusional or Grounded in Reality?
§ 18.7 One’s Purpose and Meaning: The Role of Mission
§ 18.8 Who/What We Fear: The Importance of the Peer Group
§ 18.9 Being a Leader in Your Actions
§ 18.9.1 Communication
§ 18.9.2 Positive Reinforcement
§ 18.9.3 Mentoring
§ 18.9.4 Accountability/ “Speaking Truth”
Chapter 19 Summary and Conclusions
§ 19.1 Becoming a Leader by Recognizing the Biggest Enemy You Face
§ 19.2 The Cure for Self-Deception: Get “Seeing Eye Dogs”
§ 19.3 Bringing Structure and Follow Through on the “Road to Hell Paved with Good Intentions”
§ 19.4 Communicate and Build Relationships
§ 19.5 Deal with Issues—Get in the Fight
§ 19.6 Encouragement
§ 19.7 Addressing Issues by Speaking Truth When Needed
§ 19.8 Looking Back—Some Closing Thoughts


Index

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